feigenbaumsworld:

tallestsilver:

msjayjustice:

I’m tired of being told that Wonder Woman is white.

I’m tired of being told that I can’t be her. 

Why not? In Crisis on Infinite Earths in the DCU, there was one Earth where Superman and his wife were black. In the New 52 DCU, there is an Earth where Wonder Woman is black too. And even if there wasn’t, there is still no good reason why a Black girl can’t be Wonder Woman.

I want everyone to know this. I want to show all of the fans who tell me that they’re afraid to cosplay their favorite characters because they’re not white, that you CAN be whoever you want to be, that you WILL be supported and accepted. That fandom isn’t majority racists and bigots, that there are enough of us out here who just want to have fun together to make it all worthwhile.

I am fighting for the opportunity to be Wonder Woman at PAX Prime, promoting DC Comics’ Infinite Crisis. If enough fans support me in this, I can get there. Thank you all so much for your help. Vote here.

Jay Justice is Wonder Woman end of story. Done. 

Jay Justice does one of my favorite Wonder Woman cosplayers. Just because she gets it. This is what cosplay is all about. You get to be your heroes and you shouldn’t let your skin color, gender, size, disability, or anything else keep you from being that. Don’t let other people make choices for you. Follow Jay Justice’s lead. Just look at her. She is Wonder Woman. She is Amazon. Go support her!

kkdas:

Be afraid of nothing. Hating none, giving love to all,feeling the love of God, seeing His presence in everyone, and having but one desire - for His constant presence in the temple of your consciousness - that is the way to live in this world.” ― Paramahansa Yogananda, In the Sanctuary of the Soul: A Guide to Effective Prayer

kkdas:


Be afraid of nothing. Hating none, giving love to all,
feeling the love of God, seeing His presence 
in everyone, and having but one desire - 
for His constant presence in the temple of your consciousness - 
that is the way to live in this world.” 

― Paramahansa Yogananda, In the Sanctuary of the Soul: A Guide to Effective Prayer

ancientpeoples:

Bronze figure of a seated cat

From Saqqara, Egypt
Late Period, after 600 BC

The domesticated cat is probably associated more with ancient Egypt than any other culture in the world. This cat is a particularly fine example of the many statues of cats from ancient Egypt. It has gold rings, a silvered collar round its neck and a silver protective wedjat eye amulet.

The cat is mostly identified with the goddess Bastet, whose cult centre was at Bubastis in the Nile Delta. Bubastis became particularly important when its rulers became the kings of Egypt, forming the Twenty-second Dynasty, sometimes known as the ‘Libyan Dynasty’. The rise of the importance of Bastet and the cat can probably be dated to this period.

As with other creatures sacred to particular deities, it became very popular in the Late Period (661-332 BC) to bury mummies of cats in special cemeteries as a sign of devotion to the goddess. A number of cat cemeteries are known from Egypt. See, for example, a cat mummy dating to the first century AD from Abydos.

This sculpture is now known as the Gayer-Anderson cat, after its donor to The British Museum.

(Source: The British Museum)

kankalamalini:

Copper alloy hollow cast statue of the priestess Takushit at the National Archaeological Museum of Athens.

(Source: ains0phaur)

nile-flood:

ニャンとかミューとかじゃないな フーは言いそう

(Source: archaeology-archive.com)